Lest we forget

by ACT

  • Posted on November 22, 2019

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Armistice Day, better known as Remembrance Day, is on the 11th November, which has now passed. It is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth member states and marks the day World War One ended, at 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month, in 1918. A two-minute silence is held at 11am to remember members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty.An important phrase you will hear on Remembrance Dayis“Lest we forget”. This literally reminds us “should in case we might forget”.

But what is to be done for those not remembered by a global day? Those who struggle through their lives facing hardship that is unimaginable to most? The people whose stories go unheard. This is a challenge ACT seeks to overcome. Through our work we draw your attention to the deprivation faced every day by thousands of people living in Africa who are disadvantaged.

This month our blogs have focussed on the work we are doing in the fight for education. We believe that every child has the right to, and deserves an education. Our mission is to make this right a reality.

Below is a snapshot of the difficult life Mubiru Trevor and Joseph Teitazi, two children who desperately need your support, are having to face on a daily basis.

Trevor Mubiru

Born in 2001, Trevor lives in Uganda with his grandma and brother – their father died of AIDS and his mother disappeared when he was young. The family’s only income is through digging, an unstable and volatile job which provides them with barely enough to get by. The family was introduced to ACT through Visions Ministry, our partners in Jinja, Uganda. ACT has supported Mubiru from childhood. He was enrolled in school where he learned to read and write and completed primary school. He passed the primary school leaving exams and was able to go to secondary school where he is now about to sit the O-level exams. In a recent letter, Trevor told us of his upcoming exams and his ambition to become a doctor. He finishes his letter saying, “I want to work hard so that I can help others” – to help those who, like himself, who are otherwise forgotten.With ACT support, Trevor is on track to complete secondary school and go on to do his A-levels. However, he still needs our support to pay school fees, buys new school uniforms and books in order to complete his education. ACT also contributes with food and health care for his family.

Joseph Teitazi

Across the border from Uganda, 14-year-old Joseph lives in Ntumagu, Kagera region of Tanzania. He lives with his mother and five siblings in impoverished conditions.He was only a child when his father died after a bout of malaria.  His mother does casual labour and the little amount she earns is their only source of income. He will sit the primary school leaving exams this month and hopes to pass and go to secondary school. Despite the daily hardship of his young life, Josephis very grateful for the support of ACT and is looking to the future and hopes to become a teacher to educate the next generation. Donations raised by ACT pays Joseph’s school fees and buys new school uniforms and books. He and his family benefit from health insurance and have a goat for income generation. Without ACT support, his education will stop.

Despite being about 1000 kilometre apart, both Trevor and Joseph share a similar story. Disaster struck their family with the loss of their fathers, the family breadwinners, and in the case of Trevor, also his mother. As a result, they’ve had to struggle through life from early age, hoping at best to make ends meet and just about get by. Their lives don’t make the headlines in our hectic world and there is no remembrance day for them, as such. They are people otherwise forgotten.

You can help to change this. You can ACT for the people otherwise forgotten. You can sponsor a child and help to break the cycle of poverty.

Take action now and sponsor a child by clicking here for the link.

To find out more about our work please click here.


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